Executive Management: Postgraduate Certificate, Dubai KL London Jakarta Abuja Accra Algiers Amman Doha Colombo Dhaka Delhi, Online

# 032.1 - Executive Management Course, Leading to Postgraduate Certificate in Executive Management, Accumulating to a Postgraduate Diploma, with 180 Additional Credit-Hours. This Postgraduate Certificate Programme is divided into six individual Blocks, or modules, as constituents of our Postgraduate Diploma in Executive Management. When taken separately, each Block leads to a Diploma - Postgraduate Award. Click to Download the PDF Brochure of this Course.

Course Contents include: Matrix Structure, Divisional Structure, Functional Structure, Meeting Management, Effective Agenda, Importance of Agenda,  Steps For Productive and Effective Meeting, Groupthink,  Teamthink,  Reducing Time Spent on Meeting,  Meeting Menaces,  The Waffler,  The Turf Warrior,  The Dominator,  The Interrupter,  Meeting Mismanagement,  Managerial Leadership,  Leader Behaviour in Organisations,  Scientific Management to Organisational Design,  Mechanistic Organisational Design,  Managerial Leader,  Transactional Leader Behaviour,   Charismatic or Transformational Leader,  Leadership and Authority,  Management and Power ,  Management and Control,  Leadership and Interpersonal Relationship,  Qualities or Traits Approach To Leadership,  Task and Person Orientation,  Contingency or Situational Approaches to Leadership,  Leadership and Extroversion,  Leadership and Social Needs,  Leadership and Power Needs,  Leadership and Achievement Needs,  Leader Orientation,

Person Orientation,  Employee Cantered Leaders,  Participative Leadership,  Democratic Leadership,  Performance Monitoring,  Leadership and Environmental Variability,  Leadership-Superior Subordinate Relationship,  Leadership and Team Development,  Leadership and Flexibility,  Leadership and Decision Making,  Leadership Influence and Reward,  Defining Organisations,  Social Organisations,  Formal Organisations,  Organisational Analysis,  Organisational Roles and Relationships,  Organisational Responsibilities,  Organisational Accountability,  Internal Organisational Accountability,  Upward Organisational Accountability,  Downward Accountability,  The Organisation’s External Accountability,  Accountability To Owners/Sponsors,  Accountability To Creditors,  Accountability To Sector or Industry,  Accountability To The State,  Contextualising Authority and Authority Structure,  Traditional Authority,  Charismatic Authority,  Legitimate Authority,  Professional Authority,  Power,  Organisational Power Sources,  Power Derived from Authority,  Power resulting from Control Over Resources.

 

Programme Coordinator:

Prof. Dr. R. B. Crawford is the Director of HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute, A Postgraduate-Only Institution. He has the following Qualifications and Affiliations:

Doctor of Philosophy {(PhD) {University College London (UCL) - University of London)};

MEd Management (University of Bath);

Postgraduate (Advanced) Diploma Science Teacher Ed. (University of Bristol);

Postgraduate Certificate in Information Systems (University of West London, formerly Thames Valley University);

Diploma in Doctoral Research Supervision, (University of Wolverhampton);

Teaching Certificate;

Fellow of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Human Resources Specialist, of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Member of the Asian Academy of Management (MAAM);

Member of the International Society of Gesture Studies (MISGS);

Member of the Standing Council for Organisational Symbolism (MSCOS);

Member of ResearchGate;

Executive Member of Academy of Management (AOM). There, his contribution incorporates the judging of competitions, review of journal articles, and guiding the development of conference papers. He also contributes to the Disciplines of:

Human Resources;

Organization and Management Theory;

Organization Development and Change;

Research Methods;

Conflict Management;

Organizational Behavior;

Management Consulting;

Gender & Diversity in Organizations; and

Critical Management Studies.

Professor Dr. Crawford has been an Academic in the following UK Universities:

University of London (Royal Holloway), as Research Tutor;

University of Greenwich (Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management;

University of Wolverhampton, (Wolverhampton Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management;

London Southbank University (Business School), as Lecturer and Unit Leader.

His responsibilities in these roles included:

Doctoral Research Supervisor;

Admissions Tutor;

Postgraduate and Undergraduate Dissertation Supervisor;

Programme Leader;

Personal Tutor

 

For Whom This Course is Designed

This Programme is Designed For:

Business Angels;

Management Trainees;

Management Aspirants;

Senior Human Resource Management (HRM) Officers;

Human Resource Development (HRD) Practitioners;

Retention Officers;

Recruitment and Selection Officers;

Induction Managers;

Role Enhancement Officials;

External Organisational Development Consultants;

Internal Organisational Development Consultants;

Senior Project Managers;

Internal Change Managers;

External Change Managers;

Senior Resource Managers;

Chief Executives;

Company Secretaries;

Departmental Heads;

Divisional Heads;

Executive Directors;

General Managers;

Managing Directors;

Senior Secretaries;

Vice Presidents;

Board of Directors;

Chief Executive Officers (CEOs);

Chief Executives;

Chief Financial Officers (CFOs);

Chief Secretaries;

Company Secretaries;

Corporate Managers;

Divisional Heads;

Entrepreneurs;

Executive Directors;

Executive Vice Presidents;

Human Resource Managers;

Human Resource Directors;

Management Graduates;

Management Lecturers;

Managing Directors;

Middle Managers;

Non-Executive Directors;

Organisational Development Practitioners;

Organisational Resource Directors;

Senior Managers;

Senior Project Managers;

Senior Resource Managers;

Supervisors;

University Vice Chancellors;

Venture Capitalists;

Individuals with a genuine interest in Issues associated with Organisational Structure and Control, and General Management, towards Enhanced Organisational Effectiveness.

All others who are desirous of enhancing their Proficiency in Executive Management.

 

Classroom-Based Duration and Cost:

Classroom-Based Duration: 6 Weeks (5 Days per Week)

Classroom-Based Cost:  £30,000.00 Per Student

 

Online (Video-Enhanced) Duration and Cost

Online Duration:             10 Weeks – 3 Hours Per Day, 6 Days Per Week

Online Cost:                   £20,100.00 Per Student

 

Classroom-Based Programme Cost includes:

Free Continuous snacks throughout the Event Days;  

Free Hot Lunch on Event Days;                           

Free City Tour;             

Free Stationery;                               

Free On-site Internet Access;

Postgraduate Diploma/ Diploma – Postgraduate –or

Certificate of Attendance and Participation – if unsuccessful on resit.

 

Students and Delegates will be given a Selection of our Complimentary Products, which include:

Our Branded Leather Conference Folder;

Our Branded Leather Conference Ring Binder/ Writing Pad;

Our Branded Key Ring/ Chain;

Our Branded Leather Conference (Computer – Phone) Bag – Black or Brown;

Our Branded 8-16 GB USB Flash Memory Drive, with Course Material;

Our Branded Metal Pen;

Our Branded Polo Shirt.;

Our Branded Carrier Bag.

 

Daily Schedule: 9:30 to 4:30 pm.

Delivery Locations: 

Central London, UK;

Dubai, UAE;

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;

Amsterdam, The Netherlands;

Brussels, Belgium;

Paris, France; and

Durban, South Africa;

Other International Locations, on request.

 

# 032.1 - Executive Management Course, Leading to Postgraduate Certificate in Executive Management, Accumulating to a Postgraduate Diploma, with 180 Additional Credit-Hours. This Postgraduate Certificate Programme is divided into six individual Blocks, or modules, as constituents of our Postgraduate Diploma in Executive Management. When taken separately, each Block leads to a Diploma - Postgraduate Award. Click to Download the PDF Brochure of this Course.

Block 1

Organisation and Management: Pertinent Issues, Leading to Diploma – Postgraduate – in Organisation and Management, and Executive Management Block 1

Block 1

Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

Classify formal and social organisations;

Classify business and non-business organisations;

Recognise power and authority;

Extricate social & business objectives;

Classify internal and external accountability;

Develop strategies to manage an organisation effectually in stable and turbulent times;

Demonstrate a heightened understanding in carrying out the elements of management;

Demonstrate their ability to establish an effective co-ordinating mechanism;

Design a ‘leadership strategy’, which has a high probability of greatly enhancing worker motivation and improving their morale - factors crucial to organisational success;

Influence their leadership style in such a way that they develop the flexibility to manage their organisations and subsystems effectively, in stable and turbulent times;

Discuss the key issues in designing effective organisations;

Establish objectives in designing the mechanism for success;

Apply effective time management to competitive situations;

Demonstrate a heightened understanding about the importance of delegation in human resource & organisational development;

Demonstrate a heightened understanding about the importance of communication in the process of delegation;

Determine the factors that delegates should ascertain before delegating tasks;

Determine the support that delegatees should give to their delegates during their performance of the specified tasks.

 

Block 1: Contents, Concepts, and Issues

 

B1 - Part 1: Crucial Elements of Organisational Analysis

Introduction to Formal Organisations;

Definition; Objectives – Social and Business;

Tasks;

Division of Work/Labour;

Delegation;

Responsibility;

Accountability;

Authority;

Power;

Roles;

Informal Organisations;

Case Study Analysis.

 

B1 - Part 2: The Functions of Management: Salient Issues (1)

The Functions of Management;

The Management Process: Its Universality;

Planning: The Basis for the Emanation of Subsequent Functions;

The Different Types and Levels of Planning:

Planning As Objective Establishment;

Planning As a Procedural Issue.

Organising Process, People and Subsystems;

Fundamental Issues in Designing Organisations;

Management Implications for Tall and Flat Structures;

An Introduction to Basic Organisational Forms:

Simple Structure;

Functional Structure;

Divisional Structure;

Matrix Structure.

 

B1 - Part 3: The Functions of Management: Salient Issues (2)

Organisational Design as a Function of Organisational Dynamics;

Important Considerations in Organisational Design.

Designing For Effective Product/Service Management;

Designing For Communication Effectiveness;

Designing For Effective Client/Customer Focus.

Importance of Vertical and Horizontal Relationships;

Directing or Leading;

Directing or Leading? : A Question of Leadership Styles and Administrative Strategies;

Directing or Leading? : Managerial Control Vs Worker Autonomy;

The Relationship between Leadership and Worker Motivation;

Co-Ordinating - Mintzberg’s Bases of Co-Ordination;

Mutual Adjustment;

Direct Supervision;

 

B1 - Part 4: The Functions of Management: Salient Issues (3)

Output;

Standardisation of Input;

Standardisation of Work Process;

Managing Organisations in a Stable Environment;

Managing Organisations in an Unstable Environment;

Increased Leisure Time;

Enhanced Job Satisfaction;

Reduced Stress;

More Opportunity to Switch Off After Hours;

More Room for Forward Planning and Long-Term Solutions;

Higher Creativity;

Time Management Tips for Managers;

Reducing Time Spent On Meetings;

Meeting Management;

The Trading Game Scenario.

B1 - Part 5: Delegating for Organisational Effectiveness

What Is Delegation?;

Advantages of Delegation to Delegates;

What Might Be Delegated?;

Benefits of Delegation to Delegates;

Prerequisites for Effective Delegation;

Support Necessary during Task Performance;

Importance of Communication in Delegation;

Importance of Power and Authority in Delegation;

Problems of Ineffective Delegation.

Block 2

Managing Individuals and Groups in Organisations, Leading to Diploma – Postgraduate – in Managing Individuals and Groups in Organisations, and Executive Management Block 2

Block 2

Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will:

Be aware that teams cannot perform effectively unless they understand team dynamics;

Demonstrate their understanding of their role in the management of teams in organisation;

Exhibit a good knowledge of the finer-points of team-decision-making;

Demonstrate that their inter-personal skills are well developed;

Demonstrate their ability and willingness to contribute to the enhancement of a team’s ‘problem-solving capability’;

Exhibit an understanding ‘role relationships’ in organisation;

Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of understanding the perceptions of their role set;

Be able to identify the role segment5s of their role set

Distinguish between conflict and role conflict;

Distinguish between intrarole senders and intrarole senders;

Demonstrate an enhanced understanding of interrole conflict and intrarole conflict;

Exhibit their ability to hypothise the existence of latent conflict;

Determine the positive effect of conflict in a given situation;

Demonstrate their ability to manage conflict effectively;

Demonstrate their ability to choose the most appropriate conflict resolution method for particular situations.

Employ role negotiation as a conflict management tool.

Locate employee development in a strategic context;

Demonstrate their ability to analyse training needs;

Be able to evaluate the conventional and non-conventional methods of training needs analysis;

Demonstrate their ability to develop and manage a management succession chart;

Exhibit an understanding of the use of focus groups in training needs analysis;

Distinguish between demand-led and demand-led training needs;

Exhibit an understanding of the value of action learning in determining training needs.

Be able to relate the way in which action research can be used in determining training needs;

Demonstrate their understanding of the relationship between individual; team and organisational training needs; and

Have developed a personnel deployment chart.

 

Block 2 Contents, Concepts, and Issues

B2 - Part 1: Team Dynamics: Empowering High-Performance Groups (1)

Groups: Definition;

Distinguishing Groups from Aggregations;

Group Solidarity;

Group Cohesion;

Team or Group: A Distinction;

Team Dynamics;

Types of Teams;

Command Teams;

Committees (Temporary and Standing);

Task Forces;

Boards;

Team Formation:

Forming;

Storming;

Norming/Initial Integration;

Performing/Total Integration;

Disbandment or Adjournment.

 

B2 - Part 2: Team Dynamics: Empowering High Performance Groups (2)

Purpose of Teams in the Work-Place;

Team Characteristics;

The Role Concept: An Introduction;

How ‘True-To-Life’ or Realistic Are the Forming and Norming Stages of Team Development?

Dysfunctional Behaviour in Teams;

Aggressiveness:

Blocking;

Interfering;

Competing;

Seeking sympathy;

Withdrawal; and

Special pleading.

Inter-Team Conflict;

Sources of Inter-Team Conflict;

Consequences of Dysfunctional Conflict;

B2 - Part 3: Team Dynamics: Empowering High Performance Groups (3)

Team Decision-Making;

Social Identity Theory;

Team Building and Maintenance Roles: Improving Team Effectiveness;

Encouraging Members;

Harmonising;

Standard Setting;

Gatekeeping;

Determining the Optimum Team Size;

Providing Team Incentives;

Encouraging Conflict;

Averting Groupthink;

Avoiding the Risky Shift Syndrome;

Employing Transactional Analysis;

Employing Effective Diversity Management and Discouraging Resonation.

 

B2 - Part 4: Conflict Management in Organisation

Role: A Contextual Definition;

Role Enactors;

Roles in Organisational and Non-Organisational Settings;

The Role Set;

Role Segments;

Role Expectations;

Role Sender;

Conflict and Role Conflict;

Interpersonal Conflict;

Interrole Conflict;

Intrarole Conflict;

Conflict Management: An Introduction:

Latent Conflict;

Manifest Conflict;

Organisational Value of Conflict;

Introducing Conflict;

Exploiting Conflict.

Conflict Resolution Methods:

Mutual Resolution;

Collegial Intervention

Hierarchical Intervention;

Debriefing in Conflict situations.

Role Negotiation: Beyond Worker-Manager Prerogative.

 

B2 - Part 5: Employee Development – Incorporating Training Needs Analysis

Rationale For and Definition of Training Needs Analysis;

Approaches, Methods and Techniques of Training Need Analysis;

The Traditional Approach to Training Needs Analysis;

Job Behaviour and Task Analysis;

Data Is Gathered From Field Observations Using Structured Questionnaires and Formal Interviews;

Multi-Skilling;

Knowledge Skills, And Attitudes Development;

Job, Task and Role Analysis;

A Strategic Approach to Competency Assessment;

‘Supply-Led’ or ‘Pedagogical’ Approach to Training Needs Analysis;

Demand-Led’ Approach To Training Needs Analysis;

Behavioural Expectation Scales;

 

B2 - Part 6: Employee Development – Incorporating Training Needs Analysis

Focus Groups;

Action Learning;

Action Research;

Process Management;

Assessment Centres;

Human Resource Plan;

Succession Plan;

Human Resource Audit;

Critical Incident Reports;

Individual Performance Appraisal Reports;

Personnel Deployment Charts;

Business Plans;

Strategic Plans;

Job Evaluation or Job Tasks and Role Analysis;

Client or Customer Feedback.

 

Block 3

Organisational Improvement: Revitalising Organisations through Organisational Development and Change, Leading to Diploma – Postgraduate – in Organisational Improvement: Development and Change, and Executive Management Block 3

Block 3

Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

Demonstrate an understanding of organisational development as a process;

Exhibit a heightened awareness of the constituents of organisational development;

Demonstrate an understanding of organisational climate and how it can be gauged;

Strike a balance between macro organisational development and micro organisational development;

Demonstrate their ability to incorporate specified elements of the quality of working life in the management of their subsystems and sections;

Exhibit their ability to use aspects of quality of working life to motivate workers;

Managed sensitivity training successfully;

Determine the different stages of process consultation;

Determine organisational success factors;

Demonstrate their awareness of the inevitability of organisational change.;

Demonstrate their ability to conduct an internal environmental analysis-SW;

Exhibit their ability to conduct an external environmental analysis-OT;

Synthesize the relationship between internal and external environmental analyses-SWOT;

Demonstrate the need for a proactive stance in relation to organisational change;

Determine the factors, which contribute to workers’ resistance to change;

Suggest the efforts, which an organisation might employ to reduce workers’ resistance to change;

Demonstrate their awareness of the inevitability of organisational   change;

Demonstrate the need for a proactive stance to organisational change;

Take steps to create a positive perception of the organisation, among shareholders, funding agents, clients and customers, during a strategic change process;

Manage the relationship between the organisation and its internal and external stakeholders during the different stages of the change process;

Determine the factors, which contribute to workers’ resistance to change;

Suggest the efforts, which an organisation might employ to reduce workers’ resistance to change;

Distinguish between change strategies and approaches to change;

Illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each change strategy;

Employ the correct change strategy that will create ‘winners’ even in a ‘most hopeless’ situation;

Determine the situations, in specific relation to scale, level, cost, urgency (both proactive and reactive), where a particular approach might be appropriate;

Determine the most effective ways of communicating change decisions to workers;

Illustrate the advantages and drawbacks of group involvement in decisions related to change;

Appreciate the importance of change institutionalisation;

Design measures, which will ensure change institutionalisation;

Assess the likely effect of power distance on the effectiveness of change communication, taking steps to create a favourable situation within the internal and external environments;

Distinguish between strategic and operational change;

Assess the impact of information and communications technologies (ICTs) on the change process;

Exploit the benefits of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in the planning, communication and implementation of change, being mindful of their drawbacks;

Match the mode, channel and method of communication with the nature and stage of the change process;

Determine the type, level and stage of change that might be best suited to the ‘employment’ of internal or external change agents, respectively, maintaining an effective working environment;

Appreciate the difference between individual stress tolerance levels;

Devise methods of reducing stress levels;

Distinguish between the speed of change and ‘change acceleration’;

Determine when change acceleration is necessary;

Devise a strategy that will reduce the negative effects of ‘change acceleration’;

Implement Change whilst avoiding human and organisational casualties;

Demonstrate their awareness of change management and human resource implications;

Distinguish between change strategies and approaches to change;

Illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy;

Manage latent and manifest resistance to change;

Determine the situations when a particular approach might be appropriate;

Determine the most effective ways of communicating change decisions to workers;

Illustrate the advantages and drawbacks of group involvement in decisions related to change;

Design measures, which will ensure change institutionalisation; and

Demonstrate leadership in the implementation of change, whilst avoiding whilst avoiding Human and Organisational Casualties.

Block 3

Contents, Concepts and Issues

B3 - Part 1: Organisational Development (1)

What Is Organisational Development?;

OD and Organisational Effectiveness;

Differing Perspectives of Organisational Development;

Organisational Climate;

Organisational Culture;

Organisational Norms;

Organisational Values

Organisational Power Structure;

Worker Commitment;

Structure of Roles in Organisation.

 

B3 - Part 2: Organisational Development (2)

Inter-Group Collaboration;

The Combination of the Authority Based In Roles with the Authority Based In Knowledge and Skills;

The Creation of an Open System of Communication –Vertically, Horizontally, Diagonally; Management Development;

Micro Organisational Development;

The Quality of Working Life (QWL);

Aspects of Quality of Working Life;

Adequate and Fair Compensation;

Healthy and Safe Working Conditions;

Development and Growth of Human Capacities;

Growth and Security.

 

B3 - Part 3: Organisational Development (1)

Social Integration of People;

Constitutionalism;

Protection of Total Life Space;

Social Relevance of Work;

Sensitivity Training;

Approach to Organisational Development;

Organisational Development Interventions;

Process Consultation;

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Programmes;

Macro Organisational Development;

Determination of Success.

 

B3 - Part 4: Dynamics of Organisational Change Management

Influence Change Strategy: When They Should Be Used or Avoided?;

Control Change Strategies: When They Should Be Used or Avoided?;

Communicating Organisational Change;

Communication Media;

Mass or Personalised Communication?;

Mode and Channels of Communication;

Getting the Message Right;

Timing of Communication;

Who Should Communicate What, When?;

Use of Groups in Change Process;

Managing Latent and Manifest Resistance to Change;

Effective, Overall, Change Leadership;

Leading Change Implementation;

Selecting the Appropriate Change Agent;

Internal or External;

Speed of Change;

Change Acceleration;

Averting Organisational and Individual Casualties;

 

B3 - Part 5: Dynamics of Organisational Change Management

Confidence;

Change Tolerance and Individual Stress Levels;

Managing the External Environment;

Improving Perception and Instilling;

Stakeholders, Generally;

Shareholders and Funding Agents;

Customers and Clients;

Potential Customers and Clients;

Change Institutionalisation;

Returning To Normality.

 

Block 4

Enhancing Managerial Effectiveness, leading to Diploma – Postgraduate – in Enhancing Managerial Effectiveness, and Executive Management Block 4

Block 4

Objectives

By the conclusion of the specific learning & development activities, delegates will be able to:

Appreciate the value of time in an organisational context;

Regard time as an important resource;

Apply the principle of throughput accounting to organisational;

Activities as a motivation towards effective time-management;

Devise an effective time management strategy;

Manage meetings more effectively as a time management device;

Apply effective time management to competitive situations;

Demonstrate their understanding of the intricacies that are involved in the process of leadership;

Distinguish between a leader and a managerial leader;

Relate the theories of leadership to empirical research;

Demonstrate their understanding of the need to constantly re-evaluate the superior-subordinate that they encourage;

Exhibit an understanding of the relationship between leader behaviour and leadership styles;

Demonstrate their understanding of the different aspects of the contingency approaches to leadership;

Distinguish between control and influence administrative strategies;

Demonstrate their understanding of the positive and negative implications of a manager’s choice of administrative strategy for the management of his or her organisation;

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship, which exists between administrative strategy and leadership style;

Assess the leadership style of a superior or colleague;

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between a manager’s leadership style and the type of structure, which he or she is likely to implement;

Demonstrate their ability to carefully select administrative strategies so as to promote leader and organisational flexibility; and

Propose ways of reducing cultural infringement in their choice of strategy.

 

 

Block 4

 Contents, Concepts and Issues

B4 - Part 1: Time Management in Context (1)

Time Management Defined;

Time in an Organisational Wide Context: Acting in Time;

The Cost of Time;

Time Management Tools;

Maximising Personal Effectiveness;

Busy vs. Productive;

Time Wasters/Time Robbers/Time Stealers/Time Bandits;

Managing Time Wasters/Time Robbers/Time Stealers/Time Bandits;

Combating Procrastination;

Diffusing the Impact of Others:

Handling Interruptions Constructively;

Asserting Yourself Politely and Calmly;

Conquering Over-commitment (Learn to say, “No”).

 

B4 - Part 2: Time Management in Context (2)

The Four D’s of Time Management:

Do;

Delegate:

Tasks Which Should Be Delegated;

Effective Delegation Techniques;

How to Delegate.

Dump;

Defer.

Managing Multiple Task and Deadlines;

Combating Work Related Stress;

Balancing Personal and Professional Life;

Avoiding Time Crunches;

Handling Unexpected Job Emergencies;

Human Multitasking;

Benefits of Effective Time Management;

Effects of Poor Time Management;

Time Management Theories:

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs;

The Pickle Jar Theory;

Pareto Principle or 80/20 Rule;

Eisenhower Method;

POSEC Method.

 

B4 - Part 3: Effective Meeting Management

Meeting Management:

Creating an Effective Agenda;

Importance of Agenda;

Steps For Productive and Effective Meeting;

Groupthink;

Teamthink;

Reducing Time Spent on Meeting;

Meeting Menaces:

The Waffler;

The Turf Warrior;

The Assassin;

The Dominator;

The Interrupter.

Meeting Mismanagement.

Trading Game Scenario.

 

B4 - Part 4: Managerial Leadership and Leader Behaviour in Organisations (1)

Leadership-: General Definition;

The Difference between a Leader and a Managerial Leader;

Transactional Leader Behaviour;

Charismatic or Transformational Leader;

Leadership and Authority;

Management and Power ;

Management and Control;

Leadership and Interpersonal Relationship;

Qualities or Traits Approach To Leadership;

Task and Person Orientation;

Contingency or Situational Approaches to Leadership;

Leadership and Extroversion.

B4 - Part 5: Managerial Leadership and Leader Behaviour in Organisations (2)

Leadership and Characteristics;

Leadership and Social Needs;

Leadership and Power Needs;

Leadership Sand Achievement Needs;

Leader Orientation;

Person Orientation;

Employee Cantered Leaders;

Participative Leadership;

Democratic Leadership;

Performance Monitoring;

Leadership and Environmental Variability;

Leadership-Superior Subordinate Relationship;

Leadership and Team Development;

Leadership and Flexibility;

Leadership and Decision Making;

Leadership Influence and Reward.

 

B4 - Part 6: Leadership Styles and Administrative Strategies: Improving Management Performance (1)

The ‘Leader’ vs. the ‘Managerial Leader’;

Superior-Subordinate Relationships;

Leader Behaviour;

Administrative Strategy and the Concept of ‘Puissance’;

Control Administrative Strategy;

Influence Administrative Strategy;

Merits and Demerits of Control Strategy;

Advantages and Disadvantages of Influence Administrative Strategy.

 

B4 - Part 7: Leadership Styles and Administrative Strategies: Improving Management Performance (2)

Characteristics of a ‘Theory X’ Leader;

Characteristics of a ‘Theory Y’ Leader;

Relationship between Leadership Style and Organisational Structure;

The Implications of Leadership Style for Organisational Problem-Solving and Decision-Making;

Ascribing Leadership Styles;

Influencing Your Leadership Style;

Leadership Style vs. Leader and Organisational Flexibility;

The Concept of ‘Flexion’;

Flexion and Organisational Practices;

Flexion and Leadership Inflexibility;

Leadership Style and Cultural Infusion.

Block 5

The Management of Human Resource, Leading to Diploma – Postgraduate – in The Management of Human Resource, and Executive Management Block 5

 

Block 5

Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

Calculate the Return on Investment (ROI) in Education, Training and Development;

Demonstrate a heightened knowledge of how training needs might be devised from Strategic Plans;

Demonstrate an appreciation of important of welfare in the development of personal management and human resource management;

Demonstrate awareness of the importance of communication in the process of Human Resource Management;

Demonstrate their ability to conduct a Human Resource Audit;

Demonstrate their ability to design an effective Employee Resourcing Strategy;

Demonstrate their ability to determine the type of commitment that motivate particular individuals to join an organisation;

Demonstrate their ability to lead a recruitment and Selection Team;

Demonstrate their ability to manage recruitment and selection within a ‘resourcing context’.

Demonstrate their understanding of distinction between Personnel Management and Human Resource Management;

Demonstrate understanding of distinction between personal management and human resource management;

Design a Job Description;

Design a Personnel Specification;

Design and Weight a Candidate Assessment Form (CAF);

Determine the factors influencing Human Resource Planning;

Determine the factors that Delegatees should ascertain before delegating tasks;

Determine the links between corporate planning and human resource planning;

Determine the organisation’s opportunity costs in providing Education, Training and Development for its Employees;

Determine the resources necessary to enhance individual and team performance;

Determine the support that Delegators should give to their Delegatees, during their performance of the specified tasks.

Determine when there is a need to review an organization human resource plans;

Discuss, with confidence, the factors that are associated with poor performance;

Distinguish between Education, Training and Development;

Elucidate the concerns of managers in delegating;

Exhibit their ability to take appropriate measures to improve Individual and Team Performance;

Explain the process and value of Human Resource Audit;

Explain the underlying concept of Investors in People (IIP);

Illustrate the difference between the hard approach to HRM and Soft approach to HRM;

Illustrate, vividly, how the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental and Legal (PESTEL) Factors impinge on Employee Resourcing, incorporating Human Resource Planning;

Indicate the significant aspects in the Development of Personnel Management and Human Resource Management;

Link Employee Resourcing with Business and Organisational Development;

Locate Performance Management in an appropriate context;

Manage the strategic role:

Relate the part played by Rowntree in the development of personal management and human resource management;

Suggest the importance of Human Resource Planning in Organisation Management.

 

Block 5

 Course Contents, Concepts, and Issues

B5 Part 1: From Personnel to Human Resource Management: A Strategic Development

A Distinction between Personnel Management and Human Resource Management;

The advent of Welfare Management;

The role of Joseph Rowntree in Industrial Welfare Development;

The Development of Professional Personnel and Human Resource Management;

Concerns of Personnel Management:

Recruitment and Selection;

Workers’ Welfare and Benefits;

Industrial Relations;

Staff Appraisal;

Training and Development.

The strategic significance of Human Resource Management;

Concerns of Human Resource Management:

Recruitment;

Selection;

Motivation;

Human Resource Planning;

Workforce Management Strategy;

Flexible Working Strategy

 

B5-  Part 2: Human Resource Management As A Strategic Tool

The rationale for Human Resource Planning (HRP);

The link between HRP and Corporate Planning;

Human Resource Forecasting (HRF);

Designing, implementing and reviewing the effectiveness of HRP;

The role of Employee Resourcing in Corporate Strategies and Goals;

The role of internal and stakeholders in the Employee Resourcing process;

Emergent and Contingency Approaches to Employee Resourcing;

The role of Employee Resourcing in Business and Subsystem Strategy;

The role of Employee Resourcing in the Development of Organisational Strategy;

Organisational Strategy and Employee Resourcing Strategy Compatibility.

 

B5 - Part 3: Strategising Employee Resourcing (1)

Logicalising Internal and External Selection Processes;

Internal and External Selection Processes as an Organisational Development Phenomena;

Rationalising Internal Selection as a Process;

Staff Turnover and its Negative and Positive Impact on the Organisation;

Recruitment and Selection as a Resourcing Activity;

The Importance of Human Resource Forecasts;

Methods of Forecasting Human Resource Needs of the Organisation;

The Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental and Legal (PESTEL) Factors, in the External Uncontrollable Environment and how they impinge on Employee Resourcing, incorporating Human Resource Planning;

Strategic Operational Review’ (SOR) As Prerequisite for Human Resource Forecasting.

 

B5 - Part 4: Strategising Employee Resourcing (2)

Importance of Human Resource Audit;

Conducting Human Resource Audit;

Personnel Deployment Chart (PDC);

Management Succession Chart (MSC);

Job Analysis;

Job Description;

Personnel Specification;

Market Targeting;

Designing and Placing Advertisement;

Designing a Candidate Assessment Form (CAF);

Weighting and Using a Candidate Assessment Form (CAF);

Non-Conventional Personnel Selection;

Short Listing Candidates;

Conducting Selection Interviews;

 

B5 - Part 5: Motivation in Human Resource Management

Directing or Leading: Setting The Stage;

The Conceptual Bases of Motivation;

Theoretical Bases of Motivation: An Overview;

Distinguishing Between Knowledge and Skills;

Competence and Performance: A Conceptual Exploration;

Is there a Definitive Relationship between Competence and Motivation?

Content Theories and Some of Their Contributors:

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs;

Analysis of Maslow’s Claims;

McClelland's Studies;

Taylor: Money and Motivation;

Motivator-Hygiene Factor: Herzberg’s Contribution.

Process Theories;

Equity Theory;

Goal-Setting Theory;

Expectancy Theory;

Equitable Reward Systems;

Reinforcement Theories.

 

B5 - Part 6: Contextualising Motivation in Human Resource Management

The Extent to Which Salary or Wages Inducement Motivate Workers;

Performance Related Pay (PRP);

Productivity Bonuses;

Efficiency Gains;

Profit Share;

Social Differentiation in Motivation;

Culture Differentiation in Motivation;

Wealth as a Factor in Motivation;

Class as an Issue in Motivation;

Individual Expectation and Motivation;

Individual Preferences as a Motivating Factor;

Designing an Effective Motivation Strategy.

 

Block 12

Organisational Structure and Control Systems, Leading to Diploma – Postgraduate – in Organisational Structure and Control Systems, and Executive Management Block 12

Block 12

Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

Apply the concept of Equifinality in organisational control;

Appropriately define organisational structure;

Contextualise Standardisation of Work Process;

Delineate the Importance of Communication in Organisation;

Delineate the relationship between organisational structure and leader and organisational flexibility

Delineate the relationship between Organisational Structure and Organisational Control Function;

Demonstrate an awareness of the fundamental issues associated with Organisational design and their implications for effective organisational functioning;

Demonstrate their ability to encourage the type of superior-subordinate relationship which will be conducive to organisational success

Demonstrate their understanding of the different bases of co-ordination;

Demonstrate their understanding of the factors associated with leadership Style Ascription;

Design an organisation adhering to the principles of horizontal and vertical relationship;

Determine how management information systems support organisational control;

Determine the cybernetic value of computerised information system in general organisational functioning and specifically management control system;

Determine the level of worker autonomy to permit when dealing with highly motivated staff;

Determine the place of mutual adjustment, as a co-ordinating mechanism within specific organisational settings – determined by their sizes and stages of development, and work process;

Directly associate the Levels of Worker Autonomy and Managerial Control with Organisational Effectiveness;

Discuss the co-ordinating mechanism in a simple structure;

Distinguish between different organisational structures;

Distinguish between Just-In-Time (JIT) system and Material Requirements Planning (MRP);

Distinguish between Mutual Adjustment and Direct Supervision;

Distinguish between Organismic and Mechanistic Structures;

Distinguish between the basic types of Organisational Structure;

Distinguish between the different types of Matrix Structures;

Establish the key features of a vibrant Management Accounting System;

Evaluate the impact of a haphazard Management Accounting System on the overall Organisational Control Mechanism;

Exemplify Process Scheduling;

Explain Policy Planning and Budgeting Systems, defending its value in Budgetary Control;

Explain the approaches to Organisational Design;

Explain The Import- Conversion –Export Process and the place of Remedial Action in the promotion of Equifinality;

Explain the Import Conversion Export Process;

Explain, with explicit examples, Structurally Derived Control System;

Explain, with explicit examples, the ‘Operational Control System’;

Explore the significant differences between Standardisation of Output, on the one hand, and Standardisation of Input, on the other;

Identify an Organisational Structure Type, from its verbal or textual description;

Identify horizontal relationships in organisational design;

Illustrate ‘The Conversion Process’ in their individual organisational setting;

Illustrate communication channels in an organisational chart;

Illustrate lines of authority in an organisational chart;

Illustrate the effect of organisational structure on communication within an organisation;

Illustrate their ability to design an appropriate organisational structure that takes account of contingent internal and external environmental factors;

Indicate the importance of communication in organisation for the purpose of Corporate and Operational Decision-making;

Indicate the importance of vertical and horizontal relationships in organisational design;

Indicate when Managerial Control should be relaxed, to facilitate Organisational Development (OD) and Continuous Professional Development (CPD);

Inform managers of the importance and constituents of an effective Management Information System;

Match the organisational design approach with the level of development of the organisation;

Name at least three Bases of Co-ordinating, according to Mintzberg;

Name the Fundamental Organisational Structures and their variations;

Outline the bases of an effective Computerised Information Systems;

Outline, with vivid examples, the communication requirement for Individual, Subsystem and System Needs and Functions.

Practicalise Corporate and Subsystem Communication Needs:

Provide at least three examples of a ‘Service Operation’;

Provide at least three points in support of the use of Zero-Base Budgeting, in promoting Organisational Control;

Provide at least two practical examples of the ‘KANBAN System’;

Provide examples of different bases of Divisionalisation;

Provide the bases for Structural Contingencies

Provide the bases of Organisational Communication Needs for Programme Formulation and Execution;

Provide the rationale for Organisational Communication Need to facilitate Emergencies and Contingencies;

Provide vivid examples of The Import Process;

Recommend the most appropriate structure for a particular organisation, taking contingent factors into account;  

Show the vertical relationships in an Organisational Chart;

Suggest at least three ways of Controlling the Utilisation of Organisational Resources;

Suggest the approaches which might be adopted in designing an organisation;

Suggest the reason that organisations need to ensure that their Organisational Information Speed is optimal;

Tell their counterparts how the Sequencing process operates in their own organisations;

Translate the positive and negative factors of particular types of structure to the design of an organisation which will enhance the effectiveness of an enterprise;

Typify the Loading in their individual organisations.

Block 12

Contents, Concepts, and Issues

B 12 - Part 1: Contextualising Organisational Structure (1)

Defining Organisations;

Social Organisations;

Formal Organisations;

Salient Elements of Organisational Analysis;

Organisational Roles and Relationships;

Organisational Responsibilities

Organisational Accountability:

Internal Organisational Accountability;

Upward Organisational Accountability;

Downward Accountability.

The Organisation’s External Accountability:

Accountability To Owners/Sponsors;

Accountability To Clients/Users/Customers;

Accountability To Creditors;

Accountability To Sector Or Industry;

Accountability To The State.

 

B12 - Part 2: Contextualising Organisational Structure (2)

Contextualising Authority and Authority Structure:

Traditional Authority;

Charismatic Authority;

Legitimate Authority;

Professional Authority.

Power

Organisational Power Sources:

Power Derived from Authority

Power resulting from Control Over Resources

Power resulting from Control over information, access to and control over the information flow

Power derived from Control over uncertainty

Unobtrusive Power

Delegation in Organisations:

Bases of Organisational Delegation;

Delegation and Professional Authority;

Delegation and Superior-Subordinate Relationship.

 

B12 - Part 3: Organisational Design: Typologies and Principles

An Introduction to Organisational Design;

Approaches to Organisational Design;

Classical Organisational Design;

Bases of Classical Organisational Design:

Formal Authority;

Rules and Regulations;

Precedent for the establishment of future policy.

Protagonists of the Classical Approach to organisational Design:

Max Weber;

Frederick Taylor;

Henri Fayol.

Neo-Classical Organisational Design;

Protagonists of Neo-Classical Organisational Design:

Douglas McGregor;

Rensis Likert;

Chris Argyris.

Scientific Management to Organisational Design: Mechanistic Approach to Organisational Design;

Human Relations Movement: Humanistic Approach to Organisational Design;

Contingency Approaches to Organisational Design: Structure-Environment Match:

Organisational Structure for a Stable Environment;

Organisational Structure for Changing Environment;

Organisational Structure for Turbulent Environment.

Organisational Structure and Internal and External Relationships;

Levels of Control and Role Specificity;

Mechanistic and Organismic Structures and Their Types of Relationships;

A Case in Point: The Mechanistic Factory Setting.

 

B12 - Part 4: Organisational Design Features

Vertical Relationships in Organisational Design;

Horizontal Relationships in Organisational Design;

Lines of Authority and Accountability in Organisational Design;

Types of Organisational Structure:

The Simple Structure;

The Functional Structure;

The Divisional Structure and Its Internal Relationships.

Bases of Divisionalisation:

Product Divisional Structure;

Service Divisional Structure;

Geographic or Regional Divisional Structure.

The Matrix Structure:

Divisional Matrix Structure;

Functional Matrix Structure;

Customised Matrices.

The Divisional Structure Compared with the Functional Structure on the Basis of:

Communication,

Co-Ordination,

Worker Autonomy.

The Organisation of the Matrix Structure;

Identifying and Designing Organisational Structures.

 

B12 - Part 5: Organisational Control System and Structural Relationship (1)

Control as an Operational Necessity;

Control as a Co-ordinating Mechanism;

Bases of Co-ordinating:

Mutual Adjustment;

Direct Supervision;

Standardisation of Work Process;

Standardisation of Output;

Standardisation of Input.

Structurally Derived Control System;

Importance of Communication in Organisation;

Corporate and Subsystem Needs:

Programmes;

Decisions;

Problems;

Emergencies and Contingencies;

Individual, Subsystem and System Needs and Functions.

Traditional Control Systems;

Modern Control Systems;

Management Information System;

Computerised Information Systems;

Information Speed;

Information Retrieval;

Management Accounting System;

Zero-Base Budgeting;

Policy Planning and Budgeting Systems;

The Import- Conversion –Export Process;

The Import Process;

The Conversion Process.

 

B12 - Part 6: Organisational Control System and Structural Relationship (2)

The Export Process;

Operational Control System;

Service Operation;

Process Scheduling;

Loading;

Sequencing;

Detailed Scheduling;

Inventory Control;

Cost Control;

Quality Control;

Controlling Utilisation of Organisational Resources;

Levels of Worker Autonomy and Managerial Control;

Co-Ordaining as a Control Mechanism;

Mutual Adjustment;

Direct Supervision;

Standardisation of Work Process;

Standardisation of Input-Skills, Knowledge and Attitudes;

Standardisation of Output;

Organisational Structure as a Control Function;

Communication Dissemination;

Decision Making Involvement;

Role Specificity;

Just In Time (JIT) vs. Material Requirements Planning;

Material Requirements Planning Inventory System;

The ‘IN’ Inventory;

The ‘OUT’ Inventory;

The ‘JIT’ Inventory System;

The KANBAN System.

 

# 032.1 - Executive Management Course, Leading to Postgraduate Certificate in Executive Management, Accumulating to a Postgraduate Diploma, with 180 Additional Credit-Hours. This Postgraduate Certificate Programme is divided into six individual Blocks, or modules, as constituents of our Postgraduate Diploma in Executive Management. When taken separately, each Block leads to a Diploma - Postgraduate Award. Click to Download the PDF Brochure of this Course.